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Russian Eurasianism

An Ideology of Empire

Marlène Laruelle

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Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Russia has been marginalized at the edge of a Western-dominated political and economic system. In recent years, however, leading Russian figures, including former president Vladimir Putin, have begun to stress a geopolitics that puts Russia at the center of a number of axes: European-Asian, Christian-Muslim-Buddhist, Mediterranean-Indian, Slavic-Turkic, and so on.

This volume examines the political presuppositions and expanding intellectual impact of Eurasianism, a movement promoting an ideology of Russian-Asian greatness, which has begun to take hold...

Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Russia has been marginalized at the edge of a Western-dominated political and economic system. In recent years, however, leading Russian figures, including former president Vladimir Putin, have begun to stress a geopolitics that puts Russia at the center of a number of axes: European-Asian, Christian-Muslim-Buddhist, Mediterranean-Indian, Slavic-Turkic, and so on.

This volume examines the political presuppositions and expanding intellectual impact of Eurasianism, a movement promoting an ideology of Russian-Asian greatness, which has begun to take hold throughout Russia, Kazakhstan, and Turkey. Eurasianism purports to tell Russians what is unalterably important about them and why it can only be expressed in an empire. Using a wide range of sources, Marlène Laruelle discusses the impact of the ideology of Eurasianism on geopolitics, interior policy, foreign policy, and culturalist philosophy.

Reviews

Reviews

A tour de force not merely because of the depth of the scholarship and the skill of the argument but also because Laruelle unveils a subject crucial to understanding today's Russia but never given proper due... Even the most serious student of contemporary Russia will get from this book a vastly deeper sense of what makes Russian intellectual life, for all of its vexed affinity with the West, fundamentally different.

A masterful job of describing the various philosophical threads of Eurasianism... The author's lucid style makes the book accessible to the educated general public.

This volume certainly engages the reader to explore... Laruell's deft treatment of Eurasianism's shifting position in contemporary discourse makes this a fascinating volume that extends beyond the boundaries of any single academic discipline.

Laruelle is to be congratulated on her lucid and intellectually disciplined discussion of the ambiguous, intricate, and often contradictory ideas that shape Russian Neo-Eurasiansim... a must-read for intellectual historians, policymakers, cultural scholars, Russia Watchers, or for that matter, anyone who uneasily senses that something is moving in the deep currents beneath the surface of contemporary Russia, but is not sure of what it is.

Russian Eurasianism is a lucid and rational guide, based on thorough scholarship and an admirable reluctance to sensationalize or to claim too much.

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About

Book Details

Publication Date
Status
Available
Trim Size
6
x
9
Pages
296
ISBN
9781421405766
Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Eurasianism—Marginal or Mainstream in Contemporary Russia?
The Historical Roots of the Eurasianist Idea
Neo-Eurasianism and Its Place in Post-Soviet Russia
Neo-Eurasianist

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Eurasianism—Marginal or Mainstream in Contemporary Russia?
The Historical Roots of the Eurasianist Idea
Neo-Eurasianism and Its Place in Post-Soviet Russia
Neo-Eurasianist Doctrine and Russian Foreign Policy
Marginal or Mainstream?
Premises of This Study
Plan of the Book
1. Early Eurasianism, 1920–1930
The Life and Death of a Current of Thought
A Philosophy of Politics
A Geographic Ideology
An Ambiguous Orientalism
Conclusions
2. Lev Gumilëv: A Theory of Ethnicity?
From Dissidence to Public Endorsement: An Atypical Biography
"The Last Eurasianist"?
Gumilëv's Episteme: Subjecting the Humanities to the Natural Sciences
Theories of the Ethnos or Naturalistic Determinism
The Complex History of the Eurasian Totality
Xenophobia, Mixophobia, and Anti-Semitism
Gumilëv, Russian Nationalism, and Soviet Ethnology
Conclusions
3. Aleksandr Panarin: Philosophy of History and the Revival of Culturalism
Is There a Unified Neo-Eurasianist Theory?
From Liberalism to Conservatism: Panarin's Intellectual Biography
"Civilizationism" and "Postmodernism"
Rehabilitating Empire: "Civilizational" Pluralism and Ecumenical Theocracy
Highlighting Russia's "Internal East"
Conclusions
4. Aleksandr Dugin: A Russian Version of the European Radical Right?
Dugin's Social Trajectory and Its Significance
A Russian Version of Antiglobalism: Dugin's Geopolitical Theories
Traditionalism as the Foundation of Dugin's Thought
The Russian Proponent of the New Right?
Fascism, Conservative Revolution, and National Bolshevism
A Veiled Anti-Semitism
Ethno-Differentialism and the Idea of Russian Distinctiveness
Conclusions
5. The View from "Within": Non-Russian Neo-Eurasianism and Islam
The Emergence of Muslim Eurasianist Political Parties
The Eurasianist Games of the Russian Muftiates
Tatarstan: The Pragmatic Eurasianism of Russia's "Ethnic" Regions
Conclusions
6. Neo-Eurasianism in Kazakhstan and Turkey
Kazakhstan: Eurasianism in Power
The Turkish Case: On the Confusion between Turkism, Pan-Turkism, and Eurasianism
Conclusion: The Evolution of the Eurasian(ist) Idea
The Unity of Eurasianism
Organicism at the Service of Authoritarianism: "Revolution" or "Conservatism"?
Nationalism: Veiled or Openly Espoused: The Cultural Racism of Eurasianism
Science, Political Movement, or Think Tank?
Is Eurasianism Relevant to Explanations of Contemporary Geopolitical Change?
Psychological Compensation or Part of a Global Phenomenon?
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Author Bio
Featured Contributor

Marlène Laruelle

Marlène Laruelle is currently a research fellow at the Central Asia and Caucasus Institute of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at the Johns Hopkins University. In Paris, she is an associate scholar at the French Center for Russian, Caucasian, and East-European Studies at the School of Advanced Social Sciences Studies.