Sustaining diversity and independence in scholarly publishing.

I wrote Broken Cities because I saw that ruins were being used to shape our view of the past and even to create the “pastness” of the past. As you can see by looking at the cover illustrations of any number of Classics monographs (including Broken...
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The drive to reconcile religion and science has a long history that extends to this day. It was especially pressing in the period 1650-1750, when religion was a matter of strong commitment and science was being radically transformed by new...
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In his now classic 1985 publication, Michael E. Soulé posed a profound question. He asked, “What is conservation biology?” At the time, his article defined this emerging new discipline. Within his answer was an elegant, philosophical assumption. He...
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America’s relationship to science is fraught with turmoil. Images of science have long held an ambiguous place in our collective psyche: from Frankenstein’s monster to the moon landing, people have characterized it in both nefarious and glowing...
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I wrote Inscriptions of Nature because I felt the need to write a political history of deep time, geohistory, and nature. Deep history, that is the history of the evolution of the earth, is often represented as a purely natural phenomenon; of...
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Part of the #RaiseUP 2020 University Press Week Blog Tour: Scientific Voices. That women in science must confront disproportionately significant obstacles to succeed is old news – thousands of years old. Gatekeepers (sometimes self-appointed) of...
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