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Latinos and the New Immigrant Church

David A. Badillo

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Latin Americans make up the largest new immigrant population in the United States, and Latino Catholics are the fastest-growing sector of the Catholic Church in America. In this book, historian David A. Badillo offers a history of Latino Catholicism in the United States by looking at its growth in San Antonio, Chicago, New York, and Miami.

Focusing on twentieth-century Latino urbanism, Badillo contrasts broad historic commonalities of Catholic religious tradition with variations of Latino ethnicity in various locales. He emphasizes the contours of day-to-day life as well as various aspects of...

Latin Americans make up the largest new immigrant population in the United States, and Latino Catholics are the fastest-growing sector of the Catholic Church in America. In this book, historian David A. Badillo offers a history of Latino Catholicism in the United States by looking at its growth in San Antonio, Chicago, New York, and Miami.

Focusing on twentieth-century Latino urbanism, Badillo contrasts broad historic commonalities of Catholic religious tradition with variations of Latino ethnicity in various locales. He emphasizes the contours of day-to-day life as well as various aspects of institutional and lived Catholicism. The story of Catholicism goes beyond clergy and laity; it entails the entire urban experience of neighborhoods, downtown power seekers, archdiocesan movers and shakers, and a range of organizations and associations linked to parishes. Although parishes remain the key site for Latino efforts to build individual and cultural identities, Badillo argues that one must consider simultaneously the triad of parish, city, and ethnicity to fully comprehend the influence of various Latino populations on both Catholicism and the urban environment in the United States.

By contrasting the development of three distinctive Latino communities—the Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cuban Americans—Badillo challenges the popular concept of an overarching "Latino experience" and offers instead an integrative approach to understanding the scope, depth, and complexity of the Latino contribution to the character of America's urban landscapes.

Reviews

Reviews

I am deeply impressed with David Badillo's accomplishment. I know of no other work that succeeds so well in revealing the scope, complexity and depth of reality of Latino religion in America.

Provides an excellent introduction to the religious experience of Latinos in the US... Highly recommended.

This well-written book is woven together from an abundant amount of statistical data, historical resources, government reports, contemporary commentaries, news items, and personal examples.

Ambitious in its scope. This collection of essays covers a vast amount of historical ground.

A fresh, new look at the Latino immigrant church in the United States.

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About

Book Details

Publication Date
Status
Available
Trim Size
6
x
9
Pages
304
ISBN
9780801883880
Illustration Description
14 halftones
Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1. Beginning: Catholic Religious Tradition in Spain and Latin America
2. Mexico's Revolution Travels to San Antonio
3. Colonial Dilemmas: Puerto Ricans

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1. Beginning: Catholic Religious Tradition in Spain and Latin America
2. Mexico's Revolution Travels to San Antonio
3. Colonial Dilemmas: Puerto Ricans and the U.S. Church
4. Powers of the Prelates: Urban Hierarchies Contrasted
5. Cuban Miami and Exile Catholicism
6. Suburbanization and Mobility in Catholic Chicago
7. New Urban Opportunities: Church Leadership in Texas and New York City
8. Globalization and the New Immigrant Church
Epilogue: Latino Religious Tradition as Metaphor
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Author Bio
Featured Contributor

David A. Badillo, Ph.D.

David A. Badillo is an associate professor of Latin American and Puerto Rican studies at Lehman College (City University of New York). He previously taught at the University of Notre Dame, the University of Illinois at Chicago, Wayne State University, and the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is the author of Latinos in Michigan.