Skip to main content
Back to Results
Cover image of Engineering Victory
Cover image of Engineering Victory
Share this Title:

Engineering Victory

How Technology Won the Civil War

Thomas F. Army Jr.

Publication Date
Binding Type
Request Exam CopyRequest Review Copy

Superior engineering skills among Union soldiers helped ensure victory in the Civil War.

Engineering Victory brings a fresh approach to the question of why the North prevailed in the Civil War. Historian Thomas F. Army, Jr., identifies strength in engineering—not superior military strategy or industrial advantage—as the critical determining factor in the war’s outcome.

Army finds that Union soldiers were able to apply scientific ingenuity and innovation to complex problems in a way that Confederate soldiers simply could not match. Skilled Free State engineers who were trained during the…

Superior engineering skills among Union soldiers helped ensure victory in the Civil War.

Engineering Victory brings a fresh approach to the question of why the North prevailed in the Civil War. Historian Thomas F. Army, Jr., identifies strength in engineering—not superior military strategy or industrial advantage—as the critical determining factor in the war’s outcome.

Army finds that Union soldiers were able to apply scientific ingenuity and innovation to complex problems in a way that Confederate soldiers simply could not match. Skilled Free State engineers who were trained during the antebellum period benefited from basic educational reforms, the spread of informal educational practices, and a culture that encouraged learning and innovation. During the war, their rapid construction and repair of roads, railways, and bridges allowed Northern troops to pass quickly through the forbidding terrain of the South as retreating and maneuvering Confederates struggled to cut supply lines and stop the Yankees from pressing any advantage.

By presenting detailed case studies from both theaters of the war, Army clearly demonstrates how the soldiers’ education, training, and talents spelled the difference between success and failure, victory and defeat. He also reveals massive logistical operations as critical in determining the war’s outcome.

Jump to
Quick Add
Engineering Victory

Thomas F. Army Jr.

Publication Date
Binding Type
Request Exam CopyRequest Review Copy
Related

Related Books

Cover image of Civil War Ironclads
Civil War Ironclads

William H. Roberts

$33.00
Quick Add
Civil War Ironclads

William H. Roberts

Publication Date
Binding Type
Cover image of The Business of Civil War
The Business of Civil War

Mark R. Wilson

$30.00
Quick Add
The Business of Civil War

Mark R. Wilson

Publication Date
Binding Type
Cover image of Leonardo to the Internet
Leonardo to the Internet

Thomas J. Misa

third edition
$35.00
Quick Add
Leonardo to the Internet

Thomas J. Misa

third edition
Publication Date
Binding Type
Cover image of American Iron, 1607-1900
American Iron, 1607-1900

Robert B. Gordon

$45.00
Quick Add
American Iron, 1607-1900

Robert B. Gordon

Publication Date
Binding Type
Reviews

Reviews

Highly recommended.

A thoughtful treatise on an important subject related to war, culture, and society, Engineering Victory is highly recommended reading.

Army's description of Union Army engineers and their accomplishments is certainly thorough and impressive. He relates numerous examples of how the effective use of engineers led to victory while an ineffective application led to defeat.

Thomas Army Jr. has produced an interesting and thought-provoking study of military engineering in the Civil War with which students of the war, logistics, and technology will have to reckon.

... Army has made a major contribution to the understanding of how engineering and technology played a vital role in Union victory. Every scholar interested in the Civil War, the Union war effort, and the history of technology should grapple with his arguments and their implications.

See All Reviews
About

Book Details

Publication Date
Status
Available
Trim Size
6
x
9
Pages
392
ISBN
9781421425160
Illustration Description
18 halftones, 10 maps
Table of Contents

List of Maps
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Part II The Education and Management Gap
1. Common School Reform and Science Education
2. Mechanics' Institutes and Agricultural Fairs
3. Building the Railroads
Part

List of Maps
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Part II The Education and Management Gap
1. Common School Reform and Science Education
2. Mechanics' Institutes and Agricultural Fairs
3. Building the Railroads
Part II
4. Wanted: Volunteer Engineers
5. Early Successes and Failures
6. McClellan Tests His Engineers
7. The Birth of the United States Military Railroad
8. Summer–Fall 1862
Part III
9. Vicksburg
10. Gettysburg
11. Chattanooga
12. The Red River and Petersburg
13. Atlanta and the Carolina Campaigns
Conclusion
Notes
Essay on Sources
Index

Author Bio
Thomas F. Army, Jr.
Featured Contributor

Thomas F. Army, Jr.

Thomas F. Army, Jr., is an adjunct assistant professor of history at Quinebaug Valley Community College.