ICYMI: New & Notable Articles (11 Mar 2024)

Each week, we collect the articles that we posted in the last week and put them all in one place, right here on the blog. So no worries if you missed an article we posted to Facebook, X/Twitter, Mastodon, Threads, Bluesky, Instagram and/or LinkedIn

Here they are, In Case You Missed It: 

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the latest edition of l’esprit créatur, Linda Lê’s author headshot (BaoChanTL, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons), and the text:  Linda Lê:In memoriam SPECIAL ISSUE

Linda Lê: In memoriam

Tess Do, Leslie Barnes, and Jack A. Yeager

l'esprit créateur
Volume 63, Number 4, Winter 2023

The new issue of l'esprit créateur is a special one, devoted to the rich oeuvre of the French/Vietnamese writer Linda Lê.

Get introduced — or reintroduced — to Lê’s legacy in the editors' remarks in this special issue, free on thru 22 March.

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the Spring 2023 edition of Georgetown Journal of International Affairs and the text:  Haris Durrani on Muslimness, Orientalism, and Imperialism in Dune  Listen to the 37th & The World podcast or read free in Georgetown Journal of International Affairs

Haris Durrani on Muslimness, Orientalism, and Imperialism in Dune

Haris Durrani

Georgetown Journal of International Affairs
Volume 24, Number 1, Spring 2023

Explore DUNE more deeply with a revelatory conversation with Haris Durrani in Georgetown Journal of International Affairs about Muslimness, Orientalism, and Imperialism in Frank Herbert’s classic sci-fi series

Read the transcript in the journal, and listen to the 37th & the World podcast.

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the latest edition of Victorian Review, a portrait of Tekahionwake/Pauline Johnson, and the text:  Pauline Johnson, Canada's "Indian Poetess" "The Most Unique Fixture in the Literary World of Today" Read free thru 22 March

Pauline Johnson, Canada's "Indian Poetess":"The Most Unique Fixture in the Literary World of Today"

Carole Gerson

Victorian Review
Volume 48, Number 2, Fall 2022

Emily Pauline Johnson, aka Tekahionwake, was an Indigenous Canadian poet born in 1861 who became regarded in her lifetime as “the most unique fixture in the literary world of today.”

Learn more about her important history in the new edition of Victorian Review, free thru 22 March

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the latest edition of Theory & Event and the text: In Conversation Blanca Missé and James Martel THEORY & EVENT “For Democratic Governance of Universities: The Case for Administrative Abolition”

In Conversation - For Democratic Governance of Universities: The Case for Administrative Abolition

Blanca Missé and James Martel

Theory & Event
Volume 27, Number 1, January 2024

Blanca Missé and James Martel’s recent Theory & Event article  “For Democratic Governance of Universities: The Case for Administrative Abolition” really grabbed the attention of readers — by far our most-read article in January. We invited the authors to talk more about the background of the piece and how they came to make the case for administrative abolition.

 

 

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the first three issues of Cusp and the text:  Congratulations Cusp CELJ Best New Journal   Visit the Hopkins Press blog to read a special roundtable with the editors of Cusp

Editors' Roundtable: Cusp Crowned 2024 CELJ Best New Journal

Kate Hext, Kristin Mahoney, and Alex Murray

Cusp: Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Cultures

This January, Cusp: Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Cultures became the sixth Hopkins Press journal crowned Best New Journal by Council of Editors of Learned Journals 

We gathered the editors—Kate Hext, Kristin Mahoney, and Alex Murray—for a roundtable blog discussion on founding a journal and what's next for Cusp.

Promotional tile featuring the title: ICYMI In Case You Missed It, New & Notable Articles of the Week; a collage of four of the featured journals, and a list of the articles featured at the blog

From the Archives: A Women's History Month Reading List

For Women's History Month, we pulled together a cross section of recent articles published in our journals—most of which have been published in just last year. 

This year's list touches on a range of topics related to women's history, including literature, indigenous feminisms, women's athletics, and more. We explore the histories of groundbreaking women like Panmela Castro, Pauline Johnson/Tekahionwake, Harriet Boyd Hawes, and Delores Phillips. We look at current events impacting women faculty in academia and reproductive rights in the wake of the Dobbs decision. 

Featuring articles from a wide variety of Hopkins Press journals, including American Quarterly, Arizona Quarterly, ASAP/Journal, Book History, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, Callaloo, Children's Literature, Classical World, ELH, Feminist Formations, German Studies Review, The Hopkins Review, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History, Journal of Women's History, Literature and Medicine, Lutheran Quarterly, The Review of Higher Education, Victorian Poetry, and Victorian Review, this is a reading list that might just keep you reading until next Women's History Month.

Promotional tile featuring a collage of covers of World Poltics and the text:  The Evolving Study of Revolution 75 Years of World Politics

The Evolving Study of Revolution

Mark R. Beissinger

World Politics
75th Anniversary Issue

World Politics celebrates 75 years with an anniversary issue, including an essay by Mark R. Beissinger on the evolving theories and practices of revolution, from the contentious into a more holistic approach

Free thru 22 March

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the latest edition of TK and the text: "The Traits That a Woman Has, a Man Can Have, Too":  How Collegiate Latino Men Navigate Masculinity Performance Read free thru 22 March

"The Traits That a Woman Has, a Man Can Have, Too": How Collegiate Latino Men Navigate Masculinity Performance

Ángel González, Marissa C. Vasquez, and Melissa Abeyta

Journal of College Student Development
Volume 65, Number 1, January/February 2024

The often-contradictory position Latino men hold within patriarchal privilege is examined in a new Journal of College Student Development study, revealing ways they deconstruct, redefine and make meaning of masculinity.

Free to read thru 22 Mar

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the new edition of Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, an illustration from the article (A figurative drawing diagramming “The impact of heat on humans”  Source: WMO/UNEP/WHO 1987b.) and the text:  "Inherently Limited by Our Imaginations"  Health Anxieties, Politics, and the History of the Climate Crisis  Read free thru 22 March

"Inherently Limited by Our Imaginations": Health Anxieties, Politics, and the History of the Climate Crisis

David Shumway Jones

Perspectives in Biology and Medicine
Volume 67, Number 1, Winter 2024

Since the late 1980s, health scientists have warned about the health effects of global warming. In Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, David Shumway Jones asks: As climate crises increase in the 21st century, is it still reasonable to hope that health advocacy will incite communities and politicians to act?

Read free thru 22 March

Promotional tile featuring cover art from Asian Perspective and the text: Twitter Diplomacy and China's Strategic Narrative during the Early COVID-19 Crisis Read free thru 22 March

Twitter Diplomacy and China's Strategic Narrative during the Early COVID-19 Crisis

Weiqing Song, Yinyan Ruan, and Sibei Sun

Asian Perspective
Volume 47, Number 4, Fall 2023

Despite Twitter being blocked in China, Chinese diplomats used the platform to communicate with foreign audiences as the COVID-19 crisis emerged. 

A new qualitative content analysis in Asian Perspective studies the effectiveness of their initiative.

Read free thru 22 March

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the new edition of The Classical Journal and the text: Introducing Superhero Tales into the Classroom Greek Myth and the Changing Nature of Story Read free thru 22 March

Introducing Superhero Tales into the Classroom: Greek Myth and the Changing Nature of Story

Richard L. Phillips

Classical Journal
Volume 119, Number 3, February/March 2024

Looking at Batman tales in light of Walter Burkert’s ideas about myth, Richard L. Phillips explores ways superhero tales can be used in the university classroom to help students think about the changing nature of Greek myth

New in Classical Journal

Read free thru 22 March

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the new edition of American Journal of Mathematics and the text:  On the σκ -Nirenberg problem  New in American Journal of Mathematics Read free thru 22 March

On the σκ -Nirenberg problem

YanYan Li, Luc Nguyen, and Bo Wang

American Journal of Mathematics
Volume 146, Number 1, February 2024

In American Journal of Mathematics, YanYan Li, Luc Nguyen, and Bo Wang analyze the Nirenberg problem to prove the existence and compactness theorems

Read more on Project MUSE, free thru 22 March

Promotional tile featuring cover art from the latest edition of Children’s Literature, a figure from the article (Lumley, Savile. Daddy, What Did YOU Do in the Great War? 1915, Victoria and Albert Museum, http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O74621/daddy-what-did-you-do-posterlumley-savile/), and the text:  The Exemplary Game Going to War with H.G. Wells's Toy Soldiers Read free thru 22 March “Daddy, What Did YOU Do in the Great War?” (Savile Lumley, 1915)

The Exemplary Game: Going to War with H.G. Wells's Toy Soldiers

Chloe Flower

Children's Literature
Volume 51, 2023

New in Children's Literature: Studying H.G. Wells’ fascination with toy soldiers against Robert Louis Stevenson’s toy soldier poems, Chloe Flower finds complicity in a broad cultural fantasy of masculine embodiment that denies both corporeal pain and maturation.

Read free thru 22 March

Promotional tile featuring cover art rom the new edition of Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, cover art for The Last Zookeeper by Aaron Becker and the text: Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books The Last Zookeeper Read free thru 22 March

Review: The Last Zookeeper; written and illus. by Aaron Becker.

April Spisak

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
Volume 77, Number 6, February 2024

In Aaron Becker’s wordless, post-apocalyptic tale The Last Zookeeper, a former construction robot has taken it upon itself to keep the animals in a nearly drowned zoo alive.

Read April Spisak’s review in the new Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, free thru 22 March.

Written by: Rahne Alexander
Publish Date:
Tags: Journals
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