Calls for Papers

OER and the Academic Library: Abstracts due May 15, 2019
Researching practice/Practicing research: Abstracts due August 1, 2019
Fashion in the Library: Manuscripts due December 1, 2019


OER and the Academic Library

Editors: Elizabeth Dill, Mary Ann Cullen, and Christopher Shaffer
Abstract submission deadline: May 15, 2019
Publication date: November, 2020

Nature and scope of the issue

Open educational resources (OER) are teaching, learning, and research materials that reside in the public domain, or that have been released under an open license that permits no-cost access, use, adaptation, and/or redistribution by others. Free-to-students materials that are not openly licensed, such as library resources, are often included in these programs. Academic libraries are able to function at the center and heart of OER initiatives (Young, 2018). These libraries are ideally positioned to support and lead implementation of the OER effort on college and university campuses.

The necessity for low-cost educational materials has reached a critical level. Textbook prices have increased at greater than three times the rate of inflation (Gaines, 2018; Perry, 2012) and the financial impact on students has been a driving force in the OER movement (Gaines, 2018; Senak, 2014, 2015, 2016). This financial impact is revealed in the lower rates at which different ethnicities earn college degrees (Colvard, Watson, & Park, 2018).

In advocating for OER, the NAACP states, “For too many years, too many children, particularly African American, other minorities, and underprivileged people from all groups have been subjected to lesser educational opportunities, leading to lesser opportunities for success in their personal and professional lives. A major contributing factor to the disparities continues to be the lack of appropriate instructional materials.”

The 2018 New Media Consortium Horizon Report references “proliferation of Open Educational Resources” as a midterm key trend. EDUCAUSE names OER as a 2019 top strategic technology. EdSurge declares 2017 OER’s breakthrough year as an essential teaching tool. SPARC reports that nearly one in 10 faculty across the nation are using OER. OER facilitate cost savings and have been demonstrated to increase students’ engagement and improve their learning (Weller et al., 2015). Colvard, Watson, & Park (2018) found that students are likely to have better performance when OER are used versus traditional texts.

This issue of Library Trends invites authors to explore and advance a broad range of topics and positions relevant to the creation, dissemination, use, and impact by critically addressing questions surrounding the advancing trend of OER.

Special note

Library Trends is a gold embargoed journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press. After two years the content is freely available in IDEALS, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s institutional repository. During those two years, authors are free to put a copy of the final version of the record PDF in their own repository and make it openly available. For this issue, the author agreement grants Library Trends license to publish. Authors are not required to transfer copyright. The agreement is available for review upon request.

List of potential topics

  • What role does advocacy play in OER?

  • How has information literacy been embedded within OER initiatives?

  • Describe the role of community in OER success. How can librarians successfully lead initiatives among  manage initiative-leading amongst numerous, significant stakeholders?

  • Characterize the role of labor and funding in OER creation. Is OER knowledge-production sustainable?

  • What innovative approaches have been used to involve students in OER creation?

  • How does one contend with corporatization/commercialization of OER? Can these the profit and nonprofit interests coexist? Can they commingle?

  • What is the value of OER information? How are assumptions of inferior quality overcome?

  • What discoverability issues exist in retrieving OER materials? How do you catalog OER effectively, so they can be overcome?

  • How does one effectively paint a picture of OER’s efficacy in terms of adoption rate, cost-savings, and student performance?

  • How is OER engagement measured and learning assessed?

  • What is OER's role in privilege, equity, inclusion, representation or diversity? How can OER transcend a white male content bias?

  • How do OER transcend open textbooks to open pedagogy?

Instructions for submission

The  editors for this special issue of Library Trends request that interested authors submit an abstract of 500 words, following Chicago format for parenthetical and reference list citations, by May 15, 2019. Abstracts should be sent to edill@troy.edu with the subject of “Library Trends: Abstract Submission - <author last name>.”

All submissions should follow the formatting requirements of the journal. Abstracts should include the author’s name, affiliation, and e-mail address. If more than one author is listed on the abstract, the editors will communicate with the first author only. The editors also request that the author(s) includes an informal biography explaining how her/his past and present research and/or professional experience informs her/his submission.

After review of the proposed abstracts, we will invite authors to submit full papers in early June, 2019. If you are not selected, you will also be notified at the same time. Full papers will be due to the editors by December 1, 2019; they will undergo a double-blind peer review.

The journal expects to publish the issue in November, 2020.

Timeline

May 15, 2019 Abstract submissions due

June 2019 Editors will notify author(s) whether  abstract is accepted

December 1, 2019 Manuscript drafts due

November 1, 2019 Rolling peer review begins

February 1, 2020 Rolling peer review ends

February 15, 2020 Manuscript decisions announced

March-April 15, 2020 Manuscript revision period

May 1, 2020 Final manuscripts due to editor for publication preparation

November 2020 Special issue published

Editors

Elizabeth Dill (MFA, MLIS) is an assistant professor and Director of Library Services at Troy University’s Dothan campus. A member of Troy’s Textbook Initiative Committee, she leads efforts to bring OER to the Dothan campus. The low-cost digital textbooks have saved Troy students over $294,200 University-wide. She is also an adjunct professor of theater, experienced in teaching with OER resources and incorporating open pedagogy in instruction. She can be reached at edill@troy.edu.

Mary Ann Cullen (MS Library Studies, MS Psychology) is an assistant professor and Associate Department Head at Georgia State University’s Alpharetta Campus. She has been involved in the open and affordable educational resources movement since 2013, when she participated in the adaptation of an OER text for Freshman Composition. Since then, she has assisted faculty with OER adoption and grants, presented on the Librarians’ roles in OERs at ACRL, the Distance Library Services Conference, and a Carterette Series webinar. She has been recognized as an Affordable Learning Georgia Featured Advocate. She can be reached at mcullen@gsu.edu.

Christopher Shaffer (MLIS, EdD) is a professor and Dean of Troy University Libraries. He is a member of Troy’s Textbook Initiative Committee, whose efforts to bring OER to the University’s students have saved over $294,200 University-wide. He has published in several peer reviewed journals and has considerable experience writing and implementing grants. In 2015 the Carnegie Corporation, American Library Association, New York Times, and the New York Public Library presented him the I Love My Librarian Award for his work in public outreach. He can be reached at shafferc@troy.edu.

References

2018 NMC Horizon Report. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/resources/2018/8/2018-nmc-horizon-report.

Brooks, D.C., and McCormack, M. (2019, January 28). Higher Education’s 2019 Trend Watch & Top Strategic Technologies. EDUCAUSE. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/1/higher-educations-2019-trend-watch-and-top-10-strategic-technologies.

Can OER Save Students $1 Billion? (2018, August 21). Retrieved from https://sparcopen.org/news/2018/can-oer-save-students-1-billion/.

Colvard, N. B., Watson, C. E., & Park, H. (2018). The impact of open educational resources on various student success metrics. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 30(2), 262-276.

Gaines, A. (2018). Capitalism and the cost of textbooks: The possibilities of open source materials. In K. Haltinner and L. Hormel (Eds.), Teaching economic inequality and capitalism in contemporary America (pp. 257-266). Retrieved from http://doi.org/10.1007/987-3-319-71141-6_22

NAACP: On Open Educational Resources. Retrieved from https://www.naacp.org/campaigns/open-education-resources-equity-opportunities/

Perry, M. J. (2012). The college textbook bubble and how the “open educational resources” movement is going up against the textbook cartel. Retrieved from http://www.aci.org/publication/the -college-textbook-bubble-and-how-the-open-educational-resources-movment-is-going-up-agianst-the-textbook-cartel/.

Senak, E. (2014). Fixing the broken textbook market: How students respond to high textbook costs and demand alternatives. Washington, DC: Student PIRGS. Retrieved from http://www.uspirg.org/reports/usp/fixing-broken-tgextbook-market.

Senak, E. (2015). Open textbooks: The billion dollar solution. Washington, DC: Student PIRGS. Retrieved from http://studentpirgs.org/reports/sp/open-textbook-billion-dollar-solution.

Senak, E. (2016). Covering the cost: Why we can no longer afford to ignore high textbook prices. Washington, DC: Student PIRGS. Retrieved from http://www.uspirg.org/report/usp/covering-cost.

Silagadze, M. (2018, March 13). OER Had Its Breakthrough in 2017. Next Year, It Will Become an Essential Teaching Tool - EdSurge News. Retrieved from https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-12-28-oer-had-its-breakthrough-in-2017-next-year-it-will-become-an-essential-teaching-tool.

Weller, M., de los Arcos, B., Farrow, R., Pitt, B., & McAndrew, P. (2015). The impact of OER on teaching and learning practice. Open Praxis, 7(4), 351-361.

Young, J. R. (2018). As campuses mover to embrace OER, college libraries become key players. Retrieved from https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-01-04-as-campuses-move-to-embrace-oer-college-libraries-become-key-players.


Researching practice / Practicing research: The public library in partnership with academia

Editors: Joyce Latham (University of Milwaukee School of Information Studies) and Noah Lenstra (University of North Carolina at Greensboro Department of Library and Information Studies)
Abstract submission deadline: August 1, 2019
Publication date: Spring 2021

This special issue of Library Trends seeks to energize and highlight research-based partnerships between public library staff and members of academia (faculty, staff, librarians, and/or students). The emphasis will be on partnerships between scholars and practitioners that advance knowledge of the contemporary public library. The geographic scope is international, but the time period is bounded by late 20th century to the present. It is the intention of this special issue that the public library as a civic agency become more visible, and that the knowledge base supporting public library practice and education expands.

Submissions representing any types of partnerships between members of academia and public libraries are invited. In the past, scholars and public library practitioners have:

  • Partnered for data analysisi
  • Partnered to research possible new programs and servicesii
  • Partnered for collection analysis and developmentiii
  • Partnered for needs assessmentsiv
  • Partnered for non-user studies, and for user studies on particular populationsv
  • Partnered for impact analysisvi
  • Partnered for policy analysis and library developmentvvii
  • Partnered for field-based, experiential learningviii

Research can focus on more recognizable concepts such as intellectual freedom and community outreach. It may also stimulate research on the analysis of internal administrative decision making, relationships with local governments, funding strategies for new construction, social media use, service model revisions, the impacts of other partnerships, and the development of library foundations, among other topics to be uncovered. The project encourages community engagement by emphasizing a joint approach to research design and results analysis.

This special issue focuses on public libraries because there is some evidence that the relationship between this sector and the academy has in recent years grown strained. Conversations convened by the American Library Association in 2018 and 2019 brought together LIS faculty and public library leaders: Those conversations illustrated a perceived growing gap between research and practice.ix Similarly, librarians from the United Kingdom and Canada argue that “the current state of evidence based practice and research on, and to inform, public library practice lags significantly behind that of other library sectors.”x This special issue seeks to address these gaps.

Partnerships involving those from the Library and Information Sciences, and from other fields, are welcomed and encouraged. Partnerships involving academic librarians working with public libraries are also welcomed. Articles representing different stages of project development are welcomed (i.e. under development, in progress, completed).

Timeline

August 1, 2019 500-word abstracts outlining anticipated submission due

September 15, 2019 Editors notify author(s) if abstract accepted

March 1, 2020 Article drafts due

June 15, 2020 Article decision announced

November 1, 2020 Final articles due

Spring 2021 Final publication

Please send abstracts and inquiries to the guest editors: latham@uwm.edu and lenstra@uncg.edu.

Instructions for Submissions

The editors for this special issue of Library Trends request that interested authors submit an abstract of 500 words, following Chicago format for parenthetical and reference list citations, by August 1, 2019. Abstracts should be sent to latham@uwm.edu and lenstra@uncg.edu with the subject of “Library Trends: Abstract Submission - <author last name>.” Abstracts should include the author’s name, affiliation, and e-mail address. The editors also request that the author(s) includes an informal biography explaining how her/his past and present research and/or professional experience informs her/his submission.

After review of the proposed abstracts, we will invite authors to develop full papers in early September, 2019. If you are not selected, you will also be notified at the same time. Full papers will be due to the editors by March 1, 2020; they will undergo a double-blind peer review. The journal expects to publish the issue in Spring 2021. All full submissions should follow the formatting requirements of the journal.

Special Note

Library Trends is a gold embargoed journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press. Aftertwo years the content is freely available in IDEALS, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s institutional repository. During those two years, authors are free to put a copy of the final version of the record PDF in their own repository and make it openly available. For this issue, the author agreement grants Library Trends license to publish. Authors are not required to  transfer copyright. The agreement is available for review upon request.


i Japzon, A. C., & Gong, H. (2005). A neighborhood analysis of public library use in New York City. The Library Quarterly, 75(4), 446-463.

ii Morgan, A. U., D’Alonzo, B. A., Dupuis, R., Whiteman, E. D., Kallem, S., McClintock, A., ... & Cannuscio, C. C. (2018). Public library staff as community health partners: training program design and evaluation. Health promotion practice, 19(3), 361-368; Flaherty, M. G., & Miller, D. (2016). Rural public libraries as community change agents: Opportunities for health promotion. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 57(2), 143-150; Engeszer, R. J., Olmstadt, W., Daley, J., Norfolk, M., Krekeler, K., Rogers, M., ... & McDonald, B. (2016). Evolution of an academic–public library partnership. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA, 104(1), 62.; Rhinesmith, Colin, Molly Dettmann, Michael Pierson, and Rebecca Spence. YouthStudio: Designing Public Library YA Spaces with Teens. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2015/11/youthstudio-designing-public-libr... Xie, B. (2011). Older adults, e‐health literacy, and collaborative learning: An experimental study. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 62(5), 933-946; Mehra, B., Bishop, B. W., & Partee, R. P. (2018). A Case Methodology of Action Research to Promote Rural Economic Development: Implications for LIS Education. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 59(1-2), 48-65.

iii Mehra, B., & Elder, A. (2018). Benefits to Collection Development Librarians from Collaborating with “Community-Embedded” Librarians-In-Training. Collection Management, 43(2), 120-137.

iv Kranich, N., & Senteio, C. (2018). Library Engagement with Community-based Health and Wellness in Diverse Communities. ALISE 2018. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/56666/.

v Howard, V. (2011). What do young teens think about the public library?. The Library Quarterly, 81(3), 321-344; Fisher, K. E., Durrance, J. C., & Hinton, M. B. (2004). Information grounds and the use of need‐based services by immigrants in Queens, New York: A context‐based, outcome evaluation approach. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 55(8), 754-766.

vi Campana, K., Mills, J. E., Capps, J. L., Dresang, E. T., Carlyle, A., Metoyer, C. A., ... & Kotrla, B. (2016). Early literacy in library storytimes: A study of measures of effectiveness. The Library Quarterly, 86(4), 369-388; Williams, K. Informatics Moments. Library Quarterly 82(1), 47-73.

vii Potnis, D., and Gala, B. (2018). Financial Information Literacy Toolkit to Educate Borrowers: A Channel for Public Libraries to Partner with Government for Financial Inclusion in India. ALISE 2018. https://www.oclc.org/content/dam/research/grants/presentations/2017/Fina... Le Roux, S., & Hendrikz, F. (2006). Joint use libraries: Implementing a pilot community/school library project in a remote rural area in South Africa. Library trends, 54(4), 620-639.

viii Evans, A., Dresang, E., Campana, K., & Feldman, E. (2013). Research in action: Taking classroom learning to the field. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 244-252; Most, L. R. (2011). Hands on from a distance: The community-embedded learning model contextualizes online student coursework. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 295-304; Bowen, L. M., Arko, K., Beatty, J., Delaney, C., Dorpenyo, I., Moeller, L., ... & Velat, J. (2014). Community engagement in a graduate-level community literacy course. Community Literacy Journal, 9(1), 18-38.

ixhttp://www.ala.org/tools/future/engage/public-libraries-and-lis-education

x Cole, B., & Ryan, P. (2016). Public libraries. In D. Koufogiannakis & A. Brettle (Eds.), Being Evidence Based in Library and Information Practice (pp. 105-120). London: Facet, p. 120.


Fashion in the Library

Editors: Courtney Becks and Cristina Favretto
Manuscript Submission Deadline: December 1, 2019
Publication date: August 2021

Nature and Scope of the Issue

Certain fields are viewed as “for girls”--decorative arts, textiles, interior design, anyone?--and fashion is one of them. These “girl zones”  have traditionally not been considered worthy or serious fields of inquiry and practice like film, the fine arts, architecture, or music.“Girl zones” are not buttressed and validated by a discourse of mythic salvation and transcendence like the ones that benefit, for example, hip-hop or punk (i.e. music) or film. Academic inquiry into fashion and adjacent fields (and consideration for inclusion within Special Collections and archival environments) are very often ignored or belittled because they dare favor the feminine-coded body in opposition to the often masculine-coded mindset of what constitutes a valid subject of research and study.

Indeed, libraries and fashion, as both professions and fields of research, have more in common than might seem immediately apparent. Both fields are gendered spaces, typically coded feminine/female/femme. Because of their association with women and femme qualities, both libraries and fashion must justify their continued existence in ways the film industry, for example, never does. Both the fashion industry and the library field depend upon the passion and labor of women, yet have historically tended to reward male/masculine involvement and agency to a much greater degree. Though it is a given that the work of, for example, Alexander McQueen is of genius and worth saving, the work of the many seamstresses, pattern-makers, and “hands” within the industry is barely acknowledged; nor has the importance of women fashion journalists or editors been as documented and enshrined as that of men.

Starting in the 1990s, fashion studies began to emerge (in the wake of home economics’ name change) as an academic subject in its own right. Increasingly, attention is being paid to the importance of fashion history and practice in the study of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and class. 

In the early 21st century, fashion is a multibillion dollar global industry and cultural force. Popular culture idioms like fast fashion outlets and reality shows bring fashion to a vast audience.

It is clear that the study of fashion and its role in shaping self and society will not go away, and the intersection of fashion and libraries will increasingly offer an increasingly productive vector for inquiry.

Questions this issue will consider include (but will not be limited to): what role does fashion play in library collections, outreach programs, and programming? Where does fashion belong in the library? In Special Collections? In the archives? Are three-dimensional objects allowed? Should or can libraries collaborate with museums? How do we ensure that spontaneous yet relevant intricacies of “vernacular style” and self-presentation are documented, studied, and given the respect that other less loaded forms of artistic and self-expression are given? We hope this issue will be highly interactive, exploratory, revelatory...and revealing.

List of Potential Topics

  • Librarian Fashion Tropes
  • Where Does Fashion Reside in the Library?
  • Home Economics Collections
  • “Women’s Work”
  • Disappearance of Clothing Design/Textile/Apparel Programs at Land-Grant Universities
  • The Bureau of Home Economics
  • Documenting “Hand Work” (Seamstresses, Milliners, Pattern Designers) and Fashion-Related Small Businesses
  • Fashion Studies
  • Fashion Bibliographies
  • Fashion Librarians/hip
  • Fashion (In) Special Collections
  • Who Has Access to  Fashion Collections?
  • Importance of Library Collections to Fashion Studies
  • Researching Fashion (for Exhibits, Collections, Shows, Etc.)
  • Fashion Histories

This list is by no means exhaustive. The editors are excited to consider and enthusiastically encourage the submission of perspectives and topics that haven’t occurred to them.

Instructions for Submission

The editors for the Fashion in the Library issue of Library Trends invite authors to submit full manuscripts by December 1, 2019. Manuscripts should be sent to bexlib [at] illinois [dot] edu with the subject line “Library Trends Submission.”

All submissions should follow the Library Trends formatting guidelines. Authors should use the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition author-date format for citations and bibliography.

Manuscripts should include the author’s name, affiliation, and e-mail address. Editors will communicate with the only first author of co-authored manuscripts.

Authors will be notified of their manuscript’s acceptance status in late January 2020. The double-blind peer review process begins at the same time.

The Fashion in the Library issue’s publication date is August 2021.

Timeline

December 1, 2019                   Manuscript Drafts Due

January 20, 2020                      Peer Review Begins

April 30, 2020                          Peer Review Ends

May- August 30, 2020              Manuscript Revision Period

November 1,  2020                   Final Manuscripts Due to Editors

August 2021                             Final Publication

Editors

Courtney Becks (MA, MALIS) is the Librarian for African American Studies and the Jewish Studies Bibliographer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is a former blogger and sometime fashion zinester. She is co-directing the Fashion, Style, & Aesthetics Research Cluster through the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities for the 2019-2020 school year. She can be reached at bexlib [at] illinois [dot] edu.

Cristina Favretto (MLS, CAS) joined the faculty of the University of Miami libraries in 2008 as the Head of Special Collections, where she curates collections documenting the history of Miami and South Florida, the Caribbean and South America, countercultural movements, artists’ books, architecture and art, and fashion. Before joining the Special Collections Department, Cristina has held a variety of posts throughout the country, including Head of Special Collections at San Diego State University, Curator of Rare Books at UCLA’s Charles E. Young Library, and Director of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture at Duke University.  She has also worked at the Boston Public Library, Harvard University Libraries, and the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. She received her M.L.S. and C.A.S. (Certificate of Advanced Studies) at the University of Pittsburgh, and her B.A. in English Literature and Art History at the State University of New York at Albany. Cristina spent her formative years in Trieste, Italy, and received her Baccalaureate from the Liceo Giosuè Carducci in that city. She also has had a shadow life as a performance artist and lead singer in a post-punk cabaret band.