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Masters and Statesmen

The Political Culture of American Slavery

Kenneth S. Greenberg

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Masters and Statesmen delineates a provocative set of parallels between the proslavery argument, concepts of political representation, dueling, the theory and practice of political parties, and secession in the American South. "Slavery in the antebellum South," Kenneth Greenberg writes, "was intimately connected to a distinct set of political values and practices. Ultimately these...helped shape the form and content of conflict with the North." To assert their honor and their power, Southerners rose up against the Union; secession came to be seen, paradoxically, as the only way for the South...

Masters and Statesmen delineates a provocative set of parallels between the proslavery argument, concepts of political representation, dueling, the theory and practice of political parties, and secession in the American South. "Slavery in the antebellum South," Kenneth Greenberg writes, "was intimately connected to a distinct set of political values and practices. Ultimately these...helped shape the form and content of conflict with the North." To assert their honor and their power, Southerners rose up against the Union; secession came to be seen, paradoxically, as the only way for the South to free itself from slavery.

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Reviews

Greenberg shows how planters and statesmen grappled with contradictory ideas and uses of power... His fresh insights on statesmanship, dueling, political parties and representation, the proslavery movement, and the origins and dynamics of Southern nationalism and secession give new vigor to these topics.

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Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments
Part I. Republicanism and Honor
Chapter 1. The Rhythm of Southern Statesmanship
Chapter 2. The Duel as Social Drama
Part II. The Government of Masters and the Government of

Preface and Acknowledgments
Part I. Republicanism and Honor
Chapter 1. The Rhythm of Southern Statesmanship
Chapter 2. The Duel as Social Drama
Part II. The Government of Masters and the Government of Slaves
Chapter 3. Party and Antiparty
Chapter 4. Representation
Chapter 5. The Proslavery Argument as an Antislavery Argument
Part III. The Logic of Secession
Chapter 6. From Anglophobia to New Anglophobia
Chapter 7. Sectional Conflict
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Author Bio