Back to Results
Cover image of Enslaved Native Americans and the Making of Colonial South Carolina
Preorder
Cover image of Enslaved Native Americans and the Making of Colonial South Carolina
Share this Title:

Enslaved Native Americans and the Making of Colonial South Carolina

D. Andrew Johnson

Publication Date
Binding Type

A compelling study into the history and lasting influence of enslaved Native people in early South Carolina.

In 1708, the governor of South Carolina responded to a request from London to describe the population of the colony. This response included an often-overlooked segment of the population: Native Americans, who made up one-fourth of all enslaved people in the colony. Yet it was not long before these descriptions of enslaved Native people all but disappeared from the archive.

In Enslaved Native Americans and the Making of Colonial South Carolina, D. Andrew Johnson argues that Native people...

A compelling study into the history and lasting influence of enslaved Native people in early South Carolina.

In 1708, the governor of South Carolina responded to a request from London to describe the population of the colony. This response included an often-overlooked segment of the population: Native Americans, who made up one-fourth of all enslaved people in the colony. Yet it was not long before these descriptions of enslaved Native people all but disappeared from the archive.

In Enslaved Native Americans and the Making of Colonial South Carolina, D. Andrew Johnson argues that Native people were crucial to the development of South Carolina's economy and culture. By meticulously scouring documentary sources and creating a database of over 15,000 mentions of enslaved people, Johnson uses a uniquely interdisciplinary approach to reconsider the history of South Carolina and center the enslaved Native people who were forced to live and work on its plantations. Johnson also employs spatial analysis and examines archaeological evidence to study Native slavery in a plantation context.

Although much of their impact is absent from the historical record, Native people's influence persisted: in the specific technologies they brought to the plantations where they were enslaved; in the development of Creole culture; and in the wealth and power of the founders and early leaders of the colony. This book is an important corrective to our understanding of the colonization and development of South Carolina. By focusing on the Native minority of the enslaved population, Johnson recasts the colonial history of America, uncovering the importance of enslaved Native people to the colonial project and the complex historical connections between race and slavery.

Reviews

Reviews

This study offers an important and much needed contribution to the field. Johnson carefully mines the fractured colonial archives and weaves together the histories of Indigenous and African enslavement in the American South, telling new stories that center Native women's labor, knowledge, and experiences.

A deeply researched and lucidly presented study of indigenous enslavement. Andrew Johnson locates the enslaved at ground level—where they lived and worked—documenting how Native labor immensely shaped the plantation regime of South Carolina, especially through provisioning. A book of signal importance for assessing the significance of indigenous enslavement in the larger Atlantic World.

About

Book Details

Release Date
Publication Date
Status
Preorder
Trim Size
6
x
9
Pages
288
ISBN
9781421449807
Illustration Description
2 b&w photos, 17 b&w illus.
Table of Contents

Abbreviations
A Note on Language
Introduction
1. Before California
2. The Founding of an Agro-Slaving Regime
3. The Maize and Pease Complex, Native Slaving, and the Rise of Rice
4. Native Enslavement

Abbreviations
A Note on Language
Introduction
1. Before California
2. The Founding of an Agro-Slaving Regime
3. The Maize and Pease Complex, Native Slaving, and the Rise of Rice
4. Native Enslavement Expands alongside the Maize and Pease Complex
5. Native Plantations, 1715–1740
6. Nanny and the Sherds of History
7. Epilogue
Appendix I
Appendix II
Appendix III

Author Bio