Anthropocene Fictions Examined

by bjs | Wednesday, March 20, 2019 - 10:00 AM

While not approved by official geological organizations, the term anthropocene has grown in use to describe the current geological age. Proponents of the term use it to mark the time period where humans have had a significant impact on Earth's geology and ecosystems.

MFS Modern Fiction Studies Assistant Editor Robert Marzec put the journal's focus on the Anthropocene in the Winter 2018 issue titled " Anthropocene Fictions ." A collection of fives essays joined his comprehensive introduction about the epoch.

Marzec, a professor of environmental and postcolonial studies in the Department of English at Purdue University, joined us for a discussion about climate change and how it connects with modern fiction.

Audio titled Robert Marzec, MFS Modern Fiction Studies

While not approved by official geological organizations, the term anthropocene has grown in use to describe the current geological age. Proponents of the term use it to mark the time period where humans have had a significant impact on Earth's geology and ecosystems.

MFS Modern Fiction Studies Assistant Editor Robert Marzec put the journal's focus on the Anthropocene in the Winter 2018 issue titled " Anthropocene Fictions ." A...Read More

It's Alive!: The state of Frankenscholarship

by bjs | Monday, March 18, 2019 - 11:00 AM

To help celebrate the bicentennial of Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein in 2018, Literature and Medicine published a themed issue on "Chemistry, Disability, and Frankenstein ." The issue featured 11 essays covering a wide swath of subjects related to the famous work. With a growing field of " Frankenscholarship ," emanating from the anniversary, guest editors Allison B. Kavey and Lester D. Friedman found a unique connection between the essays published in the issue. Kavey joined us for a Q&A about the issue and the future of Frankenstein studies.

You talk about the intensity of Shelley scholarship in recent years. How gratifying was it to find new ways to examine her work?

I think Les and I were very excited to see two new and interesting avenues of scholarship develop in this collection. We did not anticipate such consistency in the approaches our authors took, but we really were impressed to see the history of disability material form a strong group and the history of chemistry form the other. Both approaches develop existing scholarship in their respective sub-fields and also contribute to how...Read More

Computing and New Media

by bjs | Thursday, March 14, 2019 - 10:00 AM

Last year, Technology and Culture published a special issue titled " Shift CTRL: New Directions in the History of Computing ." With seven essays covering the development of computing over time and specific issues relating to China, Chile and Taiwan, the issue provides a wide overview of topics which impact the everyday lives of millions. Thomas S. Mullaney , an associate professor of Chinese history at Stanford University, served as guest editor of the issue and also contibuted one essay, He has agreed to share his introduction to the issue here.

We are living in a golden age for the study of information and language technologies in the modern period, and perhaps even more so for the study of computing and new media. Sustained by enduring engagements with Book History, Actor-Network-Theory, the Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) program, and Science, Technology, and Society (STS)—but also rejuvenated by concerns with cultural techniques, material semiotics, the aesthetics of bureaucracy, paperwork studies, media archaeology, neo-cybernetics, software studies, platform studies, and more—scholars have grappled with subject matter as diverse as the origins of the card catalog, the MP3 file format, French revolution-era...Read More

The New Health Economy, the Private Sector, and The Road to Universal Health Coverage

by eea | Wednesday, March 6, 2019 - 2:00 PM

Understanding the roles of the private sector as part of the roadmap to Universal Health Coverage (UHC) at the country level will be indispensable to helping most countries achieve UHC by 2030. A new book edited by Jeffrey L. Sturchio (Rabin Martin), Ilona Kickbusch (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva) and Louis Galambos (Johns Hopkins University) provides a range of insights into the extent and impact of the global health economy and how private firms are contributing to improving population health outcomes. In this blog, the editors outline the perspectives addressed in The Road to Universal Health Coverage (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019):

Universal health coverage (UHC) – defined by the World Health Organization to mean that “all people and communities can use the promotive, preventive, curative, rehabilitative and palliative health services they need, of sufficient quality to be effective, while also ensuring that the use of these services does not expose the user to financial hardship” – is at the heart of the Sustainable Development Goals, adopted by all UN Member States in 2015. Like many ambitious global goals, UHC remains an aspiration for many countries. Today, the WHO estimates that...Read More

A Night at the Museum

by bjs | Wednesday, March 6, 2019 - 10:00 AM

Loren Lerner, Ph.D., is Professor of Art History at Concordia University. In 2005, she was curator of “Picturing Her: Images of Girlhood / Salut les filles! La jeune fille en images” at the McCord Museum. This exhibition project led to her editorship of Depicting Canada's Children in 2009.

Lerner's sustained interest in images of young people is the subject of articles in a wide spectrum of publications, spanning the late 18th century into the present time, including Rethinking Professionalism: Essays on Women and Art in Canada, 1850-1970 , Canadian Children’s Literature , Journal of Canadian Art History , Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth , Girlhood Studies , Historical Studies in Education , Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada , Healing the World’s Children and Girlhood and the Politics of Place .

A pedagogical commitment to student web publishing has guided Lerner’s teaching and the development of websites such as Picturing Children and Youth: A Canadian Perspective and Family Works at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

She suggested a special issue of the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth ...Read More