New Editor Charts Bold Course

by bjs | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 - 2:00 PM

In 2018, Karen Pinkus moved into the editor position at the journal diacritics . The journal is based at Cornell University where Pinkus is a Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature . We previously spoke with Pinkus on a podcast about a 2014 special issue on climate change criticism she edited. Pinkus joined us for a Q&A to talk about her new role at the journal.

How did you end up in the position of editor?

Our editors serve three-year terms. To my great surprise, I was nominated by other members of the editorial board. I certainly wasn't thinking about it, but as I wrote a statement in support of my candidacy, I realized the editorship would allow me to reach out to a very diverse group of scholars I've met over quite a few years in academia (and in different institutions and fields of study), and to think creatively about how to engage a new generation of potential authors. Again, to my great surprise, I was elected, last July. It's really important to me that we maintain our strict policy of double blind peer review. I...Read More

Digging Into New Ethical Issues Around Stem Cells

by bjs | Tuesday, May 22, 2018 - 3:40 PM

Discussions concerning the ethical issues related to stem cells have been ongoing for many years, but a special section in the latest issue of Perspectives in Biology and Medicine takes a deep look at some of the newest and most complex issues – including the direct global sales of services and untested and unproven products marketed as stem cells.

Guest edited by Tamra Lysaght and Jeremy Sugarman , the special section on Ethics, Policy, and Autologous Cellular Therapies in Volume 61, Issue 1 includes six essays that examine the potential impacts of using a person’s own stem cells on patients, health-care systems and the public trust in science and medicine.

“Many scholars in bioethics, law, medicine, philosophy, sociology and stem cell science worry such practices will place patients at risk of unnecessary harm and exploit vulnerable populations with unsubstantiated claims of clinical benefit,” says Lysaght, Assistant Professor in the Centre for Biomedical Ethics at the National University of Singapore.

The issue developed from a symposium held in Singapore in May 2017. The symposium was a collaboration between the Centre for Biomedical Ethics at the National University of Singapore,...Read More

JHUP ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE CONVERSATION & MADE BY HISTORY

by eea | Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 10:27 AM

Johns Hopkins University Press director Barbara Kline Pope has announced an innovative combination of initiatives aimed at amplifying the impact of ground-breaking scholarly work published by the Press. New partnerships with the acclaimed curated news sites The Conversation and Made by History will give Press authors and journal editors and contributors significant new opportunities to frame their expertise and insights for audiences beyond the academic realm through “explanatory journalism.”

“These two platforms combine to advance the core mission of our book and journal publishing—bringing the deep expertise of researchers and academics to broader discussions of public issues,” said Pope. “We are committed to making a positive impact on the world through the dissemination of solid, peer-reviewed knowledge and information. These partnerships make it even more likely that our authors and editors can make a difference through informed, civil public discourse.”

As the first university press to join The Conversation as a supporting member, JHUP aligns itself with a widely-praised effort to “provide a fact-based and editorially independent forum, free of commercial or political bias.” The Conversation launched in the U.S. as a pilot project in October 2014, offering...Read More

Putin’s New Russia: Fragile State or Revisionist Power?

by bjs | Tuesday, May 15, 2018 - 10:00 AM

The Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University held a September 2015 conference and subsequent talks about the New Russia of President Vladimir Putin. The journal South Central Review recently published a collection of articles from those events called "Putin's New Russia: Fragile State or Revisionist Power." Andrew Natsios , Director of the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs at the Bush School, shares some of his thoughts on the topic. He also appeared on our podcast series to talk about the journal issue.

by Andrew Natsios Director of the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs Bush School of Government, Texas A&M University

When Boris Yeltsin named Vladimir Putin Acting President in December 1999, many in the western capitals hurriedly attempted to determine who he was and how he rose in three years from being an obscure municipal official to Acting President of Russia. In his earlier career, Putin served 16 years in the KGB, the Soviet Secret Police, as a Lt. Colonel assigned to East Germany. After retiring from the KGB, he went to work in St. Petersburg city government in several posts, including Deputy...Read More

How Did Putin's Russia Develop?

by bjs | Monday, May 14, 2018 - 1:00 PM

The Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University held a September 2015 conference and subsequent talks about the New Russia of President Vladimir Putin. The journal South Central Review recently published a collection of articles from those events called "Putin's New Russia: Fragile State or Revisionist Power." Andrew Natsios , Director of the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs at the Bush School, guest edited the issue and joined us for a discussion about the issue.

Audio titled Andrew Natsios, South Central Review by JHU Press

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