Pindar's Homer
The Lyric Possession of an Epic Past
a machine readable edition
Gregory Nagy

Copyright © 1980, 1997 The Johns Hopkins University Press. All rights reserved. This document may be used, with this notice included, for noncommercial purposes within a subscribed institution. No copies of this work may be distributed electronically outside of the subscribed institution, in whole or in part, without written permission from the JHU Press.

Table of Contents


Introduction Introduction: A Word on Assumptions, Methods, and Aims
1. Oral Poetry and Ancient Greek Poetry: Broadening and Narrowing the Terms
2. The Poetics of Panhellenism and the Enigma of Authorship in Early Greece
3. The Panhellenization of Song
4. Pindar's Olympian 1 and the Aetiology of the Olympic Games
5. The Ordeal of the Athlete and the Burden of the Poet
6. Epic, Praise, and the Possession of Poetry
7. Pindar and Homer, Athlete and Hero
8. The Authoritative Speech of Prose, Poetry, and Song: Pindar and Herodotus I
9. The Authority of Historiâ and the Sign of the Hero
10. The Charms of Tyranny: Pindar and Herodotus II
11. The Ainos as Song or Speech: Pindar and Herodotus III
12. Authority and Authorship in the Lyric Tradition
13. The Genesis of Athenian State Theater and the Survival of Pindar's Poetry
14. Pindar's Homer
Appendix A Comparative Survey of Pindar's Meters
Copyright © 1980, 1997 The Johns Hopkins University Press. All rights reserved. This document may be used, with this notice included, for noncommercial purposes within a subscribed institution. No copies of this work may be distributed electronically outside of the subscribed institution, in whole or in part, without written permission from the JHU Press.